Preschool

Preschool Profile: Lycée Français de San Francisco

November 17, 2014

Lycée Français de San FranciscoEstablished in 1967, Lycée Français de San Francisco (LFSF) offers a unique opportunity for young children to learn and grow in a truly international environment. LFSF operates on three campuses: primary and secondary schools in San Francisco, and a new, fully renovated preschool and primary school campus in Sausalito. From a very young age, students learn to express themselves as curious and motivated learners, exchanging cultural and linguistic perspectives within a rich and diverse student body representing 65 nationalities and 35 languages overall. You can learn more about the school and its programs at lelycee.org.

Please describe your school’s philosophy. What is it all about?

Rooted in the French national curriculum, with close ties to the French government and the AEFE worldwide network of French schools, LFSF teaches children by immersing its students in language and culture from day one. Non-francophones are able to integrate our classrooms though the kindergarten level.

What You Can Do to Help Prepare Your Preschooler for Kindergarten

August 6, 2012

Marin Mommies presents a guest article by dad, parenting coach, author, and co-creator of Studio Grow Tom Limbert. Learn more about him and how he helps parents and families at parentcoachtom.com.

Somewhere in a big room with a long table and a bunch of chairs, some guys decided the way to fix our failing education system in America was to cram all the curriculum down to younger children quicker and sooner. These visionaries went on to conclude that it would be a good idea to test all those children and, based on those results, reward some schools and penalize some teachers. Teachers felt the pressure so they taught more children faster. They needed those more children to be more ready when they started kindergarten in the first place. So parents felt the pressure and decided to hold most of their children back until they were “ready” for kindergarten. If you have a preschooler right now you know all too well about this pressure. Bet you’re stressed about whether your child will be ready. Hoping your school will bring him up to speed? Me too. But there’s plenty parents can be doing at home to help prepare their children for kindergarten.

Most parents immediately think of numbers, letters and colors when they think of early childhood education and kindergarten preparedness. But any preschool or kindergarten teacher will tell you, there’s much more to it. There are social and emotional elements that are much-less quantifiable than the cognitive aspects of development, but just as integral to a child’s performance in school. The good news is there are many ways you can help prepare your child for kindergarten in your home on a daily basis. You don’t even have to go out of your way really. Just be a bit more alert to learning opportunities. Keep in mind that in order for the machine that we prefer to call our schooling system to operate effectively, children will mostly have to be able to focus, follow directions and respect others.

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