The Marin Preschool Guide

Marin Preschool Guide

The Marin Preschool Guide

Choosing a preschool for your child is an important decision. The Marin County Preschool Guide is the best and most comprehensive directory of preschools in Marin, and features reviews and ratings from fellow parents to help you make the best choice possible.

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San Anselmo Montessori
Featured preschool:
San Anselmo
Little Mountain Preschool
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San Anselmo

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New Preschool at Greenwood School for Fall 2010

February 15, 2010

Greenwood SchoolMill Valley's Greenwood School has announced the opening of its new preschool for fall 2010. Greenwood School will offer a Waldorf-inspired preschool program for children ages 3–5 where students are provided with a secure, caring, and structured home-like environment to begin their school years. This newly established preschool program will offer an early childhood experience where teachers create a safe and meaningful classroom community in which children hear stories, see puppet shows, sing, bake bread, make soup, learn to make beautiful and useful things, explore nature, build houses and structures out of natural materials, and celebrate seasonal festivals.

Two-, three-, and five-day programs are available as well as afternoon care from 12:30 to 5:30 pm. Applications are now being accepted for September 2010, and children may enroll at any time during the year if space is available. Enrollment is open to all children who are 2 years 9 months to 4 years 6 months by June 1 prior to desired entry.

New Parent-Child Program at Marin Waldorf School

December 2, 2009

Marin Waldorf School in San Rafael is offering a new Parent-Child program starting December 3. If you want to learn more about the Waldorf approach to parenting principles, this is a good way to try it out and get acquainted. These are warm and inviting gatherings, filled with a spirit of play, community, and love for the parenting journey.

Each meeting also includes open discussion about parenting and how Waldorf ideas can support parents and provide skills to nurture their relationship with their child.

  • Special Season Session for Young Toddlers
    December 3, 10 and 17
    Thursdays 9 to 10:30 am
    Session fees: $75
  • Pre-crawlers to Crawlers
    Thursdays, January 7–April 1 and April 22–June 10, 11:30 am to 1 pm
  • Babies and Pregnancy, for Pregnancy and Infants
    Fridays, January 8–April 2 and April 23–June 11
    11 am to 12:30 pm
    Session fees: winter $275, spring $185
  • Young Toddlers, walking up to 2 years of age.
    Fridays, January 8–April 2 and April 23–June 11, 9 am–10:30 am
    Session fees: winter $275 • spring $185
  • Older Toddlers, 20 months to 3 ½ years.
    Thursdays, January 7–April 1 and April 22–June 10
    9 to 11 am or Saturdays, 9:30 to 11:30 am
    Session fees: winter $300, spring $200

For more info, call Barbra Rosen (415) 479.8190 ext. 147 or go to www.marinwaldorf.org.

Bilingual Education Benefits and How to Find a Program

July 7, 2009

“Come si dice?” “Comment le dit-on?” “How do you say it?”

Take a look at any local parenting website, newsletter, or newspaper and you’ll see plenty of ads for language enrichment programs for kids. What is this increasingly popular phenomenon and why should you take advantage of it?

According to neurobiologists, the human brain is “hardwired” to learn languages as an infant and toddler. Any language learned during this period is stored, literally, in a different part of the brain than language acquired later in life, and in the right environment young children can learn up to four languages without significant slowdown. No kidding. At this age the brain has a limited-time-only specialized plasticity to form the neural pathways necessary for easily and naturally absorbing multiple languages. This ability starts to taper by age three or four and is diminished by puberty. Ironically, high school is the age at which American children have historically been first formally exposed to a second language. Ask anyone who’s ever taken 9th grade Spanish how naturally and easily it came to them.